After your death, your friends and loved ones will look to your estate plan to know how to handle your affairs. It is important that your plan includes details about every aspect of your life. Not only will this allow your estate to proceed smoothly through probate, but also it ensures that you tie up every loose end and do not leave any sticky situations for your loved ones.

One thing that some people may easily overlook is the care of a pet. Your pet may be part of your family, but your loved ones may not feel the same way. If you do not want your beloved pet to end up in a shelter, you need to make sure you address its care for it in your estate plan.

Providing for your pet

U.S. News and World Report explains that you have the option to set up a trust for your pet. This trust would require a trustee to manage the funds. You can designate that the money goes only to the care of your pet. You also have the ability to dissolve the trust upon the death of your pet.

Using a trust helps to ensure that the money you leave for pet care goes to its intended use. Anyone can say they will take care of your furry friend after your death, but the trust can give your pet some legal protection even if that person fails to carry out his or her promise.

Choosing a caregiver

In most cases, you will want to choose a caregiver in addition to a trustee. This can help you avoid a conflict of interest that could lead to issues down the road when you will not be around to handle them. Choose a caregiver carefully: Make sure it is someone who wants to care for your pet and will be happy to take on the responsibility. Name this person in your will as you would a guardian of a child.