Deciding whether to keep an elderly loved one at home or move them to a nursing home is often an agonizing decision for Washington residents. Not only must you consider their medical needs, but also their safety in a new environment, removed from your care. We often represent clients who have loved ones suffering from nursing home neglect.

AARP reports that your role changes from caregiver to advocate when a loved one moves into a nursing home. When visiting the care facility, you may hear complaints from her. She may not be happy about certain events or believe she is not getting what she needs. Determining whether the criticism is legitimate and what action you must take is challenging. Solutions to some issues are more straightforward than others.

Work through roommate conflicts

In most situations, a room has more than one resident. If the issue arises shortly after moving in, a period of adjustment is normal. However, if the problem continues, requesting a room change can resolve the issue. You may help ease the transition by getting involved with the nursing home. Computer instruction for residents, reading or offering other talents can ensure you and your family are familiar and welcome at the facility. It can also help you keep an eye on your loved one’s care.

Report lapses in care

You likely spent a great deal of time learning about the facility and discussing the features with your elderly family member before relocating them. If you notice problems with the quality of care not meeting your expectations, you should note and report serious issues. Bedsores, weight loss, lack of attention to illness and personal hygiene are among the most common symptoms of a bigger issue. If the staff is unresponsive, an in-depth investigation can help determine the cause of the problem. You may have grounds for a claim.