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Do motorcyclists suffer a higher risk of skull fractures?

On Behalf of | Aug 28, 2021 | Personal Injury

When it comes to driving, motorcyclists often face a lot more struggles than the drivers of covered vehicles. With a smaller vehicle that offers essentially zero external protection, it makes sense that the risks motorcyclists take far outnumber their counterparts.

But does this prove true for everyone? Do motorcyclists suffer a higher risk of skull fractures than any other person on the road?

Helmets and a reduction of skull fractures

Merck Manual takes a look at skull fractures and the numerous potential problems they pose. Skull fractures serve as one of the biggest and riskiest head injuries that come along with a potentially lengthy and difficult healing period. Despite that, they often do not get as much press attention as traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) or concussions.

Skull fractures can also occur any time the skull meets with blunt force trauma. Most people may assume this automatically puts motorcyclists at greater risk, but this is not necessarily the case for one specific reason: helmets.

Motorcyclists should always wear approved helmets whenever they are on the road. Studies show that helmets reduce the risk of head injury to a fairly large degree, with one study even claiming that they reduce the risk of skull fractures by up to 69 percent.

The importance of seat belts

Drivers of covered vehicles can worry less about meeting the pavement directly, but the seat belt is the only tool they have when it comes to protection from bouncing around inside of the vehicle or even going through a window. This can actually increase the chances of a skull fracture.

But the ultimate takeaway is that safety measures of all sorts can prevent skull fractures no matter where someone is. Buckle up, wear a helmet and see a great reduction in the chances of facing a fracture to the skull.